7 Tips for Landing a Product Marketing Job

According to the 2022 MarTech Salary and Career Survey, average salaries for marketing professionals are $141,965. For those interested in product marketing, you may find it difficult to land the perfect job. 

So, we asked a few experts for their advice. Here are 7 recommendations from leaders on how to land a product marketing job.

1. Get a Product Marketing Certificate

It can’t hurt to get a leg up with a product marketing certificate. When potential employers see that you’ve invested time and money into earning an education in product marketing, they will sit up and pay attention. This is particularly helpful if you have limited or no experience working in product marketing.

– Lindsay Hischebett, Flaus

2. Leverage the Power of Storytelling

Product marketing is all about storytelling. If you want to apply for a job in this field, you must know how to tell good stories. Product marketers don’t just have to inform potential buyers about the product. In fact, they are hired to let the audience know why it matters for them to purchase the product. 

To tell a good story, product marketers will have to frame the problem buyers are facing. It will highlight the value of the product and why their product is the solution. This way, marketers will be able to position the product in the market and carve out its own space.

– Eric McGee, TRGDatacenters

3. Ask a Product Marketer

Why beat around the bush? Go directly to the source. If you want to land a job in product marketing, find product marketers, start developing relationships with them, and create your own mentoring program. For instance, sign up for the Product Marketing Alliance and start talking with product marketers who you connect with. 

Ask them out for coffee or for a weekly zoom call, and see how they did it and what insight they offer. People love helping, and they love being reminded that their career is a success and sought after. 

– Karim Hachem, Sunshine79

4. Build a Portfolio

Take some freelance work offered on LinkedIn or an industry tracking board just to boost your experience and have a diverse portfolio to show off. It’s not like the company you’re interviewing will know how much you were paid or ask to know. They are interested in the quality of your work to have peace of mind that they’re making the right decision in hiring you, so provide them with a strong portfolio.

– Monte Deere, Kizik

Let’s take a brief break to learn how to craft a resume to land your product marketing job.

5. Do Your Homework

Before you head into the interview room, do your homework. Take a deeper look at who the target audience is and how the company is currently positioning their product relative to competitors. 

While you won’t be expected to have all of the answers about a new-to-you product or market, it will help you come into the conversation with better insights, so you can have a meaningful discussion about the product positioning.

– Monica Thysell, OnPay Payroll Software

6. Demonstrate Flexibility

When applying for product marketing roles, keep in mind that you should come across as an adaptive candidate who can collaborate cross-functionally with the interviewer. The priorities within an organization change rapidly and that is why the product marketer needs to be flexible and adaptive. 

For instance, if there is a critical change that needs to be made to the product before it is released, you will need to respond quickly and make the right modifications to your marketing plan. Additionally, you should mentally prepare yourself to collaborate with different teams, for which you must exhibit a cross-functional skill set. Ultimately, achieving goals requires collaborating with different people.

– Rameez Usmani, The Stock Dock

7. Demonstrate a Results-Oriented Perspective

Being able to demonstrate that you are results-oriented is the top characteristic that sets product marketers apart. Whether the candidate has 10 years of experience or is a college student who headed a project with a student group, employers need to hear about past accomplishments in terms of reaching and working toward goals. 

When I ask a candidate to describe a notable achievement from a job that I’ve picked for them based on their CV, many of them tend to be stumped because they don’t have concrete results to tell.

– Josh Tyler, Tell Me Best

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